Reconciling with the Layers in Multi-Layered Historic Cities
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Historic cities, due to their continues habitation, creation and development processes, can be regarded as complex and heterogeneous organisms. This complex organisms embrace each historic periods’ characters by regenerating a new urban whole in relation with the former urban structure by configurations, transformations and continuities. Thus, this new urban whole, which is the outcome of superimposition of the previous and latter urban historic layers in a continual historical stratification, creates the significant identity of multi-layered historic cities. Therefore, sustaining this identity is definitely related with making the remaining elements, evidences and marks of the former periods an integral part of the current urban agenda and context. For this reason, together with the stratified structure of the multi-layered historic cities, the evidences and traces of successive periods should comprehensively be understood, commensurably conserved and integrally considered in the urban planning and design strategies.

Historic cities, due to their continues habitation, creation and development processes, can be regarded as complex and heterogeneous organisms. This complex organisms embrace each historic periods’ characters by regenerating a new urban whole in relation with the former urban structure by configurations, transformations and continuities. The lecture by Leyla Etyemez Çıplak tackles with the complexities related to design in multi-layered historic cities with a holistic perspective.

Bio:

Leyla Etyemez Çıplak received a bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the Middle East Technical University in 2008 and a MSc in Restoration from the METU Graduate Program in Restoration in 2011. She completed her PhD in Cultural Heritage Conservation Program in METU in 2017. Between 2009 and 2017 she worked as a research and teaching assistant in the METU Department of Architecture. Her MSc thesis is about assessing the integration of historical stratification with the current context in multi-layered historic towns. Her PhD subject concentrates on the construction techniques applied and developed by Mimar Sinan, which underlie the structural characteristics of Classical Ottoman Architecture. Now she is an instructor in Çankaya University Department of Architecture.